Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Georges Descombes, “Designing a River Garden

Good evening, everyone.

I see many facesfrom outside, so I want to thank you for coming inspite of the heavy rains, which we need.

Yet nevertheless, it'snot easy to get here.

My name is Anita Berrizbeitia.

Welcome again.

I will introduceour speaker tonight.

It is often said that his work,the work of the Swiss landscape architect GeorgesDescombes, is memory.

It's about memory,memory of place.

He works through a combinationof historical research, a collaborative practicewith biologists, restoration ecologists, artists, architects,and his own extensive field work.

And through thisprocess, he has built a series of exquisiteprojects that never fail to surprise and,more importantly, to engage our imagination.

For more than adecade, he has been working on the restoration ofthe banks of the River Aire and of the flood plain ofthis river outside of Geneva.

In some ways, themandate for this project is typical of today– toremove the concrete walls that constrain the flow of waterand to restore its banks to a naturalized condition, withall the accompanying benefits that this bringswith it, including flood control, habitatrestoration, and the recovery of the land's rural identity.

But this simple chargein Descbombes's mind is not so straightforward.

In characteristic ways, he takesthe more challenging approach of questioning and reconsideringthe very purpose of the project brief, the dismantlingof the walls.

To offer a more nuancedand complex notion of history, of memory, ofpresence, and of the territory where so muchunfolds, he decides radically to keep the wallsand to redefine the project boundary sites.

I quote here from thedescription of the project.

"A bundle of lines movesfluidly and crosses a straight, clear,horizontal line.

The River Aire freelyrambles across the plain, but the liberationof this Geneva river has not led to theeffacement of its canal.

Between the river andthe fine rectilinear work which retain its whims, ahappy co-habitation was found.

" In other words,this is not simply a work of reconstruction, but away of looking and working that admits manyhistories, techniques, and textures of place.

Given the events ofthis past week here, it is impossible to ignorethe political underpinning of this way of working, forthe restoration of this river is a project not of editingout, but of inclusion.

Of his way ofdrawing– copiously, to use his ownwords– Georges has said that he most appreciatesthat it is quiet work, and I take this tomean thinking time.

I am most fascinatedby the fact that he transfers the quiet to us,the visitor, by inducing reflection.

His work requires immersivethinking, slow looking, deceleration.

Whether through the scalerdistortions of a tunnel footbridge Lancy,the layered mesh screens that refocus our eyes inthe pavilion in the Swiss way, or the recompositionof the fragments that constitute theMemorial at Bijlmer, his work demands and enablesthe free association of ideas and of history as an unfolding,multilayered process.

It would not be a stretchto say that he demands of us to see in the sameway that he draws– quietly, thoughtfully, conscientiously.

And then, when we aredoing with our quiet, we find ourselves jolted outof our habitual ways of seeing.

For the revitalizationof the River Aire, the project that he will betalking about tonight, Georges and his team have been awardedthe prestigious Swiss Landscape Award, the Schulthessdes Jardins in 2012, and it was a finalistfor the Rosa Barba Prize in the Barcelona Bienalde Paisaje this fall.

Please join me inwelcoming the 2016 Kylie Lecture, Georges Descombes.

Thank you, Anita.

Thank you for inviting me.

I'm very honored to give thislecture, the Kiley Lecture.

I should start with a fewwords on Kylie, what importance of Kylie's work for me.

It's not that I'm sofamiliar with his work, but some part of hiswork is a key element if I have understoodanything about gardens.

In the MillerGarden, for example, I find something which is key.

A word for me is what's a kindof intensity or interiority.

You were talkingabout the calm, but it can be also very violent.

But there is somethingvery special, and difficult to define what you feel whenyou– the same with apprentice and pupils maybe.

[INAUDIBLE] is a[INAUDIBLE] for me.

Around the pool,he did something.

The pool was there beforeHogg started to work on it.

And he made some movesthat would change it.

What is, for me, a line totry to understand what I feel or what I try to explainwould be a presence.

These gardens have apresence, and Walter Benjamin said an aura.

An aura, one of thedefinitions– Walter Benjamin's is the collisionof space and time.

In these gardens, Benjaminsaid, in front of these things, inside of these things, they arevery present and sometimes very far away.

They melt past and present.

So this is for me–Mr.

Kiley [FRENCH].

I am indebted to this.

There are not so manygardens like this, and it's not really themost trendy tracks today, I would say, thiskind of intensity.

But we can discuss this.

And I would like to call thislecture tonight– it's rather a conversation, I would say.

I would not dare to call it alecture in terms of academia.

I said, "Designinga River Garden," so I will come back on thisa while– a river garden.

Maybe it's not evenEnglish, river garden, but it sounds well,at least in French.

And I will call it "TheRiver and Its Double," so it's a river on a canal.

This was the situation,a canal built this part in the 20th century.

But there isupstream that started after a flood I show you inthe end of the 19th century.

You see here the formerriver, the original river short-circuitedby the new canal.

This was a landscape,or it's a drawing.

You imagine what could havebeen this traditional landscape at that point.

It's not difficult.

And they did that.

I mean, they justchanged radically.

They cleared thesite with carbon.

And they changed in theprocess of another kind of agricultural system.

For that, they have done400 kilometers of drainage.

I've no time to talkabout the drainage.

But Geneva, as aparticularity, you know, it was irreparablyProtestant in a very Catholic country, around France.

And that, in the19th century, they were absolutely fascinatingby the British industrial revolution.

And they bring backto Geneva– so they had a geographic magazine.

So as they were takingeverything from England in terms of innovation,the British or, rather, the Scots, have alreadyreformed the Romanish way of making drainage, andGeneva, the first drainage on the continent was done here.

These drawings also show[INAUDIBLE], I guess.

There are tools of the project.

Those are my drawings.

But just imagine something.

So it's the activatedpossibilities.

It could be– so is therealready a selection, they are not realistic, butthey are more than realistic.

They are more useful for me.

This is a region,the first image was a photographwith the mountains, the agricultural plane, andthe canal, which is here with a row of Italian poplar.

And this is a park in Lancy.

So it's really alifelong project if you add that I wasborn somewhere here, and that I play all my childhoodhere, around this spot here.

So the garden in Lancy, Iwould rather now term it garden than park in Lancybecause it's a very small park.

And I don't likeparks, in a way, talking about theconcentration– and well, we cancome back to this.

But let's say garden in Lancy.

And I show this because it'salready a double situation like the river andthe canal here.

We had to makeunderground foot passage.

But we were– this canalizationof the little rivulet, one meter wide.

When indeed thedrainage systems, they block the valleyhere with a new road.

And they put thecanal in a culvert.

So the client, thestate of Geneva, let's say, asked us to makea passage for the children, mainly, which wascrossing the talud, which is a tunnel situation.

If you cross amountain, it's a tunnel.

But to come from oneside of the river to the other side, whichis a bridge situation.

And we kept the bridgeand the tunnel together.

So we call it tunnelbridge– which maybe could be emblematicof our a way of doing.

We find the solution,but, in this solution, you can have the ideaof the problem which was existing before.

So the solution does noterase the combination– the problematicsituation [INAUDIBLE].

This is a Mt.

Saleve, thewatershed of the air.

And this river, which isa torrent– torrential– can be very drymost of time very, very little amount of water.

But quite often, orseveral times a year, it can be furious, like this.

And this is the onlyreturn of 30 years.

So you can imagine when,the Sentinel flood, it could be very disastrous.

So the state of Genevamade a competition.

But not so much–well, it's for what they called re-naturalization.

It's rather withecological purposes.

You know, this canal of the19th century, or 20th century, was perfectly working toget the flood downstream.

So you send theproblem to others.

But it's perfect, ina way, to preserve the situation of thefields, agriculture, it was a perfect device.

And we must not make toomany are not anachronisms– 80 years ago, therewas no fertilizer, so they had to producemore and to protect the field for agriculture.

So let's say that,for one century, this canal didits job very well.

But now, with thechange in the situation, in the way we see theseproblems, it had to be changed.

So there was acompetition that we won.

And we designed this.

So this is the canal.

And here, you seealready something which is predominantin our design problem.

You don't know howto draw a river.

Well, when the riverdoes not exist yet.

And in the competition,we did this.

And it was a veryhelpful drawing because when I presented thatin the early stage at Berkeley, Matt Kondolf, with afluvial geomorphology– its very clever– which isalso working with us, say, oh, I like your dancing river.

And this was important.

You said, Anita,but you also said that it must not be too long.

So I go like this.

We are not doing aproject without taking into consideration thedata who are there.

I mean, it's a routine.

It's necessary toselect in the path.

I will come back toevery kind of idea.

And this drawing, whichthree meters long, and not exactly the original, but–was in the archives of Geneva.

And I was, I think, thefirst to open the drawing after it was drawn in 1819.

So it's a very useful tool.

So these are presentedbecause the territory is full of projects.

But it's also full ofproject never executed.

So the people have soughtalready to shortcut the river.

Excuse me.

It's the same– wego with the water.

We send the water down.

But the interesting thing,for us, was this section.

So they did one thing.

What is surprising,what is extraordinary, is the simplicity,the efficiency of the engineer at that moment.

Not so many drawings.

Not so many blah, blah, blah.

But a very, very beautiful[FRENCH], length profile, and 135 transactions.

And did on two years.

So you can move.

If see that theriver, in certain– if you take thissection, we could see that the river movefrom 40 meters, for example, one year after.

So extremely interestingand beautiful drawings.

Once I talked with Aldovan Eyck, the architect.

He said, architects are verygood to organize professionally the intellectual meager.

The less you know, themore you draw, in a way.

You understand what I mean? You can hide your incompetencethrough tons of nice images.

And when you see thiscanal as it was existing, that's a preservation.

The only one problemis it [INAUDIBLE] was not drawn byLeonardo da Vinci.

Otherwise, we'd havekept it, not because it is so perfect, in a way.

It's a disaster interms of biology.

No exchanges with theunderground water.

You know that better than I.

But nevertheless, what to do? So these drawings weremade 20 years before we start to work on the canal.

It was for the park inLancy, the garden in Lancy.

Because, in a way,it's a straight line.

I don't want to come back tothe park in Lancy drawings.

But you know, this extension ofthe bridge, foot bridge, tunnel bridge, which is 100 meters longto cross a river of one meter rivulet, it's a kind ofextravagant dimension.

Certainly, it's thiskind of accentuation, intensificationcomes from this line.

There is a kind of adialogue between what is going on one kilometersahead and what we take.

But I will come back later.

But maybe it's betterto say that now.

One way of doingis to introduce, into a well known situation, ashock to renew the attention.

We are not soft.

We are maybe quiet, but softin a way that we are shy.

No, we are ambitious, not shy.

But we have alsoa good, I hope– we know the limit ofsituation, of capability.

But we try our best to introduceinto a too well known context something whichis shocking, which makes things strange, to renewthe attention, not everywhere, but some you will see that, allalong, it's always the same.

Actually, art is just like this.

And for mearchitecture, is an art, no discussion– or otherwiseit's bad architect.

And art is just to make visiblethe invisible, the ordinary.

I will come back.

A fantastic canal, eh? So this is a diagram.

You know, it's acompetition drawing.

And it's [INAUDIBLE].

So Gilles Deleuze,what is a diagram? I don't talk aboutdiagram in terms of semiology and [INAUDIBLE].

That's another chapter.

It's primarily a metaphoricuse of the world jack diagram introduced by Deleuzetalking about Francis Bacon painting.

And he said, adiagram is something which shows the place of theforces at work on a site, or on a painting.

There are forces, we callforces a lot of things.

But something isinvolved in the problem.

And you know, the drawings, thisdiagram, according to Deleuze, is a way of impeaching theforms to arrive too fast.

Not, I think too fast.

Because he said, there's nomystery of the white page.

Because the whitepage is never white.

It's full of cliches.

So as soon as youstart to work, you have all the automaticpilot of the cliche.

And you start to drawlike Adriaan Geuze or like– I don'tgive other names.

I said Adriaan Geuzebecause I like him.

So if I start to saysomething– you understand.

So diagram is a precautionto keep for a moment but indicating whereyou have to look for.

And it's very clear.

Our project had to workwith a canal and a new space for the river.

So this was reallyfirst sketch, not mine.

And when you start to drawto enter in the detail into complex data and so,this diagram is saying, hey, hey don't go awayof this combination.

And this was– so in thebrief, in the implicit brief of the competitionwas very clear.

You destroy the canal,which is a straight line, and, in nature, thereare no straight lines.

And you put the riverin the form of meanders.

That was clear.

And we said no.

We will keep thecanal, transform it, and we will shiftthe river parallel with the same wavelengthand amplitude, and the formermeander, but parallel.

I think, to have an historicalinterest in the constitution of a site does not mean thatan historical project is the one who goes back.

It's a bit simple.

And we have an extraordinaryhistorian, French historian, now, College de France,Patrick Boucheron.

He said, antiquitas, youhave to select in the past the active part of thepast that's useful for you.

Not all the past because youare buried under all this.

A lot of the pasthas just to be– maybe another partof the past will be useful for another project.

But in a project, you must find,it's a courage of a hypothesis.

I don't say we were right,but this canal, and the river, is better and toput back the river.

By the way, theyalways say there are no straight lines in nature.

But I tried a very, verylong to find an example.

But now I've seen,when I was driving, the sun behindthe clouds, I have seen that the rays of lightare pretty much straight.

And I think theyare natural, no? We said we will dothis combination of the form of canal transform.

We'll come back.

And a new– whatMatt Kondolf called a space of liberty, acorridor of [INAUDIBLE], when, you know, something–this is a double, or the river, and its double.

This is a ghost of the canal.

You feel for the river.

This is a project, it'sabout five, six kilometers.

Depends if you measure itlike this or like this.

We don't know howto measure a river.

It's impossible Now we are faced withdesigning this dancing river.

How do you do that? I'll come back now andtalk a bit on the river, for clarification,and then on the canal.

Well, the best thing todo is to get rid of humus.

It's 67, 70 centimeters.

And you let the water gointo– you don't do anything.

You help the river buterasing the humus layer.

And then the riverwill design itself.

And it goes quitefast, the river.

Because, otherwise, youhave two ways of designing a river– the engineer, let'ssay hydraulic engineers, there's a slope,a volume of water.

They will give you asinusoid, or depends.

They know how to draw it.

And we have thelandscape architects, who have another culture.

Let's say this is a scientific,so-called scientific, technique, rather.

And then you havethe cultural model, who we have all had a charming,meandering river, which is very beautiful indeed.

But how to do it? So the engineer usuallyuses very concrete blocks, or very solidthings, because they are sure that it doesn't move.

And we have a tendency touse green concrete– that means plants or things.

But the idea is the same.

The river must not move.

And as Matt Kondolf said, atthe first big flood, engineers and landscapearchitects, all the same, the river doesexactly what it does.

The problem is it takes time.

You know, a riverloves to design.

But they design whenthere is a flood.

Otherwise, they have not enoughvolume of water, and not enough strength to carry the sediment.

So we were questioned bythe environmentalists.

They said, well, it'svery nice, your trick.

But it's too long.

So they come back with amachine and make holes, put trunks, rocks, and startto make what we were avoiding.

So it's a kind of impatience.

So we were lookingfor something else.

So we were asked,could you find a way of accelerating the processof building the new riverbed.

And by chance, more or less, youknow, my knowledge of science is a bit– you read,and you say well, it may be quantique physique.

It's a bit like this.

It is impossible tounderstand exactly what is, for me, physique quantique.

And I think Niels Bohr said, ifsomeone tells you that is easy, that means that he doesnot understood anything.

So one Nobel prize,Pierre-Gilles de Gennes was working onpercolation systems, which is going through a porousmaterial of a liquid, which is exactly what is a river.

Gravel and water.

And the matrix ofindetermination.

It's a bit like that.

So they don't knowhow to– they don't know where the water will go.

But they prepare anhexagonal diagram, and the water issurprisingly– so it's a way to design without design.

And we try, on a Swiss device,with chocolate and milk.

Really, I thought,maybe it works if we do something like this.

So I was in my atelier, andwe took a block of chocolate.

And we tried to– andsaid maybe we could work.

And then we try on site.

So the surprise was that thefederal experts have accepted this, that was [INAUDIBLE].

I will come back.

So we had– the firstway of doing was here.

This was when we justtook the humus away.

And now we have onekilometers, more or less, here, of a new phase of building.

So we did that.

So it's the same.

So it's more than humus here.

But let's say the superficiallayer is taken away.

And gives a kind of plateau.

And then we startto draw and to dig.

So we made this [FRENCH].

And then we arrived to thiskind of, and this, and this.

And now, we were afraid.

Now, if the water comes,and she selects one, we will be fooled, really.

All this work for nothing.

It's making [INAUDIBLE].

Then well, theplanes above Geneva were backing us, in a way.

It's interesting.

Mr.

John– where is he? I think they callit templum, which is, in Greece, the place whereyou could predict things.

The detail.

So the water arrived andwas very gently [INAUDIBLE].

And the erosion starts.

And there we found thatbecause, of course, its chocolate block was square.

And now this is a lozenge.

It's much betterfor the [INAUDIBLE].

And then we start to seethat the erosion is never at that peak, butalways on the side.

It's complicated.

I don't enter in detail.

And then we found, in anotherscientist, Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers, theycall it structural dissipative.

Dissipative structures.

Diversification.

And you find that also inLeonardo da Vinci, Tourbillon, the white pools,where it's always the head of thelozenge diverts water.

And the water turns onthe side and erodes.

You can see the evolution.

It is in one year.

And you see.

Now, we had very big problems–not with the federal experts, who accept– becausethey were not satisfied with the two precedentways of doing landscape architect– and scientists.

And they were looking forsome other way of doing.

But our own experts were saying,it's a delirium– le delire chocolatier.

The big fear of these guyswas, all the gravel goes down.

But it's not the case.

Matt Kondolf said a riverdoesn't go straight.

It takes the materialand puts it here.

They erode on[INAUDIBLE] and deposit.

So erosion deposits.

And now, we didn't have thatin mind at the beginning.

But it was veryinteresting in terms that we economizeda lot of excavation and taking away the earthon the site cost a lot.

And also, because if you takeall this away, which was there, I think, 60,000 cubic meters,could mean 6,000 trucks.

And the river needs thesematerials, these sediments.

So you make a double mistake.

It costs a lot,and you don't know what to do with thesediments you export.

And the river is askingfor this sediment.

So we were lucky enough.

And you see, very soon–so we made a graphic for the evolution.

But going into theriver information, it's extraordinary.

I mean, I could show youimages for– immediately, when you have water comingback here, life is coming back.

As you realize that wateris the source of life, you see flowers,insects, birds, fish.

And this process is muchbetter than the first solution because it's reallyaccelerating, and it's going.

You have pools andriffles immediately, after six months, which was notthe case in the first attempt.

So it's really an intriguingdevice, as you said, Mr.

Kondolf.

Intriguing and working.

So when we pretend tohave a kind of laboratory touch in this project,so the monitoring is extremely important.

So we have survey with adraw and [INAUDIBLE] photo, and geometric on the site.

So we measure, andwe take an account of all the movementsof gravels, et cetera, to see if our machineis really working.

So here you seevery well the river with a new space of freedom,and the canal transformed.

The canal is transformed.

It was three metersdeep, the trapeze.

So we kept one meter–I'll show you that– deep.

And so we put earth on the twothirds of the canal's depth.

It's still a footprint.

A footprint is apermanent trace.

Animals make trace.

But footprint is a permanent,something which stays.

So we made, here, akind of footprint, which is a launching device.

So it's destinationis to disappear.

It's entropy [INAUDIBLE].

We were really anticipatingthe destruction.

So we are not really–you understood that.

And you see how theriver already built.

And when you have a flood,it's coming here, of course.

Now you see thesection of the canal.

And this canal becamea public space.

We say, this machines,the river and its double, we are faced now with asituation of environment, with water qualityshortage and so on.

So if the gardenhas always been, it's why we insist tosay it's not a park.

It's a garden.

Because, in the garden–I hope John is not going to correct me– thereis always leisure, pleasure, knowledge, and risk.

So we wanted thatpeople, in a way, would be here and look at whatis going on in this open air laboratory.

Why does it do that? Confrontation with theagricultural fields, still there with the[INAUDIBLE] coming with the pollution of water.

So this linear series ofgardens are really moments– I'll show you then– — whereyou can look at, realize, what is going on like apossibility to understand this experimentation.

So this is the canal which isstill taking all the surface water of the left side becausewe can't go to the river directly.

So we kept that.

And we introduced in the canalall traditional vocabulary of pergola and so on to have amoment where the people can sit in shadow, when it will bea bit more, with benches, and all the tra-la-la ofthe ordinary, decent garden.

But for a moment, for thisquestion of observation, a lot of people were,we want Belvedere, which is also a very classical–well you look at Belvedere.

You have an observatory.

So you can see that,maybe, here, you know, I have not so good slide.

But you see thesemountains are here.

If we use a depositpart of the digging here to make thisborrowed landscape.

So these hillswere also playing.

These people climb and seethe river, see the experiment.

But also, when they aredeeper in the canal, the profile of thenew dunes, or hills, are mimicking, doing the same,than the far away mountains.

So this problem of exportingyour borrowed landscape.

We already did it.

The use of footprint is really,in the metamorphosis evolution, the footprint isreally something.

The figure inside the moule,the footprint can move.

But the footprint gives you,always, an idea of the origin.

This is a permanenceof the transformation.

Something more that you canguess through this print that it was a bitlike this before.

We had to make aproject in Amsterdam.

An airplane crashedinto a building.

And so the footprintof the building was the evocation ofwhat happened here.

One of these blocks was here.

So going back, goingdown in the ground and then– I have notime to enter in detail how you would design all this.

But the fundamental things,the diagram, in that case, is a footprint.

Now you see what we havedone with– this image is a bit late.

Now the canal is here andthe you have this play with the Alps and the Saleve.

We had to also tocontrol the flood.

So we have some certaindike, this one here.

It's a dike here.

Topography is going down here,so if we have a big flood here, in this hole, 100 cubicmeters per second can go.

If there is more, therewill be a lake here.

Kind of a control of the floodto protect the city of Geneva down.

And this also wasn'tan occasion to have this interiority of a garden.

Suddenly, here, you are framed.

You don't see the agriculture.

You don't see the organization.

You are inside something.

And it's case where we makethis shock or strange situation, where we wanted to have acantilevered slab of concrete going up to the water, sokind of like an attraction that you can touch the water,smell that water, touch the water, listen to the water.

So these are very classicalthings you find in the garden.

Kind of an invitation,organization of the view of the [INAUDIBLE].

These thresholds arenot perpendicular.

They are oblique infront of this platform.

It's coming from aNoguchi in UNESCO garden.

Instead of having this parallelthreshold with a cascade, there is a walk forthe pedestrians.

So incline the cascadetowards the viewer.

It's a kind of signthat the river is not indifferent to the viewer.

And Noguchi is really,for me, also a reference that I like to consult.

And to make this very thinthing, it needs a lot of work.

And also Noguchi said, withlandscape architecture, when you draw, it's50% of the work.

The rest of the50% are on the site because you never knowexactly what you are going to find in the ground.

You know exactly the levels.

And the surprises are alsointeresting moment you know.

The building, themaking of the site takes you in a more interestingsituation than you imagined.

So you have to alsoto be attentive, to know what the site proposes.

And, for example, here,but I have nothing to say.

It's just a control ofwater, the theater of water, the play with it.

All this isnecessary to control, and it's not necessary tomake exactly this shape.

We have a kind of latitudeof interpretation of what we have to do and how we do it.

And sometimes it's surprising.

Depends in whichdirection you look at.

Reminds me Chatsworth,straight line, 17th century.

Now otherconsiderations are, you said we are quite–I hope you understood that we transformed things,taking and destroy something.

You already guessedthat, when I start to talk about theborrowed landscape, it's not exactlythe same vocabulary.

Or we enter in anotherconsideration of prospect vista which may be– Elissa Rosenbergwrote about Lancy, saying, it's about as the layeringof things and how the historicallayers of the site are expressed by the project.

It's not exactly picturesque.

It's rather– it's another,maybe, way of doing.

But here, it'ssomething special.

It's part of the project here.

We have a road comingfrom a little village.

And we have aspecial, here, place where, here, we'll seethat better after– there was a bridge here.

The river was doing like this–a former meander, coming here.

So this is the ruin or abridge, with just one side of the bridge remaining.

And this is going to– andMr.

Rousseau was there.

In the Confession, hesaid, when he was 17, he flew from his home,and his real life started.

He was in Confignon.

And Confignon is here.

And the bridge is here.

And the road I show you is here.

Now, as an architect, we said,are we ignoring completely Mr.

Rousseau afterhis importance in terms of a change ofthe appreciation of nature, the sublime, the 18th century.

So how to work with Rousseauwithout putting the a plaque with "Rousseau was here," whichwas not what we were looking.

So here is a bridge.

Now I had an idea.

Maybe it's a bad idea.

But I read again, evensometimes, for the first time, it depends on thebooks– Le Confession, Les Reveries du PromeneurSolitaire– all the books where Rousseau.

And I was underliningand taking away every time he was expressinghis sentiment towards nature.

So he likes rivers.

We have a river.

He likes ruins.

We have a ruin.

He likes trees, and, undertrees, a bench, and a fountain.

We make a fountain.

We have a bench.

He likes cherry trees.

We'll make a cherrytree orchard.

He likes blue flowers becauseit's a bit like Proust, when you see blue flowers,it's wow, when I was young, I ate blue flowers.

So our client was Rousseau.

And we also look at Laurent.

And you know, this is a river.

Well this is a sea,but we can say, well, it's more or lessthe same situation.

It's going down,and we have ruins.

So we made that.

And this is a fountain.

This is a bench.

These are trees, and so on.

You know, this is a Rousseau-istsituation with, here, even more– this isa form of bridge.

We change it with thevegetation, herb green, like in Stourhead, oreven in [INAUDIBLE].

So all this is abit– now, the people are not going tounderstand, maybe, if I don't explain you this.

So we had a discussion with Mr.

Hunt, John Hunt– John Dixon Hunt.

Are all these peoplegoing to Stourhead, knowing all the [INAUDIBLE],a Virgilian touch? Mr.

Tribe would say, no, today'signorant people, they have no idea why they did all this.

OK.

May be true, but, as Johnsaid, nevertheless, there are other thingsthat the monument.

There are topography,trees, flowers, sky, and, after all, Virgil wastalking about something.

Why we like Virgil? That's maybe a hypothesisyou can discuss.

But I have a tendency tothink that all Rousseau or Virgil were talkingabout things we like.

So if Rousseau said I likea tree, and you like a tree, you are near to him, evenif you don't read Rousseau.

What is the mostimportant, in a way? It's also to have a kindof [FRENCH] because today, we need, maybe, to slowdown and to take back to the very simple facts thatbe under a tree, on a bench, near a fountain, is important–more than having an abracadabra project, which is competingwith TV reality show.

And talking about takingtime, it's about a walk.

We have a lot of walk.

And you know, I wasin London, at the AA.

And in East London, I hadtaken this in '73, I think.

I loved these things.

The guy who designedthat– you know, it's absolutely notparallel to the canal.

It's a rambling.

So it's like, I don'twant metro, boulot, dodo.

No, no, you are not goingto make me directly go.

I want to ramble, totake my time, slow down.

And we make this[INAUDIBLE] Pierre LeGrain in Dorothee Imbert'sModernist Garden in France.

Pierre Legrain.

You have the zig-zag,the bench, and the trees.

And we found the situationourself, the same situation.

So it was a mixtureof London souvenir– I loved this surprisingdesign– and also Legrain.

Because usually,too often, you have these boring parallel tubesthat you have to follow, both sides the same.

Here, and we had exactlythe existing orchard hedge and zig-zag.

And my father was a bookseller.

And I remember becausePierre Legrain was also making beautiful [FRENCH].

And this is nearly my project.

Immoralist, Andre Gide.

And it's immoral.

So I've still, how much? Five minutes.

We'll finish on the walk.

This is a project, theSwiss Path, made in '91.

It was to commemorate the700th birth of the Swiss Confederation.

Around a lake, which is[FRENCH], 36 kilometers, a walk made by each canton.

We have 26 cantons.

And each canton had acertain segment length according to the number ofinhabitants, five millimeters by each inhabitant.

It included the foreigners.

And we had to dotwo kilometers here.

Now, we said, it's a bitlike the renaturalization.

There was an offer,a competition, and all the others, exceptPaulo Borghi and me, we projected on thisterritory all the grandeur of the countryside, the canton.

The import, and wesaid no, we would like to avoid the common[INAUDIBLE], blah, blah, blah, [FRENCH], and to say, weare going to understand your own territory.

So we are going to make a kindof archeology of the site.

We are going to goaway with bad things.

And we had a motto.

We will not add anythingwhich is not already there.

Because imagination,according to Baudelaire, is not a fantasy.

It's just to makevisible the things here, or another poet, Swiss-French,rather German-Swiss, Ludwig Hohl, he said, imaginationis not fantasy.

It's just a way to raise thetemperature of the existing things.

Or your William Carlos Williamssaid no ideas but in things.

So the things are here.

And it's up to you todo something with it.

This is what we callform imagination.

So to look at the paths it'slike the parallel lines, both sides of the paths.

Or you imagine that the pathsare always at the same thing.

So we had the people whoshow that, on the contrary, the path is alwayschanging its position.

Once it's yellowhere, and then red.

And so we work on this,showing, making visible, that the path washere and now here.

And when the stones onthe side were lacking, we put concrete stones.

So this was more or lesswhat we have done here, just underlying.

And we were alsoworking with artists.

This is Richard Long.

You know, for me,it's always a lesson that this work ofLong in the '70s is called brushing the path.

So he just took a brushand took off the leaves.

So I think it's agood way of designing.

He came here, and hemade a walk around.

I have no time to explain you.

It's another workof Richard Long.

You know, I am stilljealous of this work.

Because to be so, you know,where you said, we are not shy, we are not soft, becausethis is very rough to say, a cross in the flowers.

But it's done just tocutting the flowers away.

So it's just a deliberateclearing and a sign.

Richard Long is part, atleast at the beginning, in the '70, '69, of themovement Arte Povera.

And this is a lesson for usbecause Arte Povera attracted the attention ofmaterials without glory, situation without glory,everything ordinary.

That we can make sculpturewithout extravagant– and this attentionto what is not seen, usually, it's really, forme– I have to be brave, but you understand theconnection between what we are doing on the site, andthese movements, or [INAUDIBLE] saying everything isgood to make a project.

We don't have to say, ohno, this is disgusting because it's galvanized.

And so in this, always, thesame project, in Swiss Path, there devices to getrid of the water.

There were in wood, bythe army, by the way.

That must be the artistic themeof army, makes these very soft wooden things.

And we change itin steel, having in mind RichardSerra in Netherlands, where he made, usingthese kinds of materials, we could say, atthat moment also, it was part of–who are the artists? They are never the artists whodeclare that I'm a land artist, or I'm an Arte Povera artist.

But there is some [INAUDIBLE]in that case who said, they are workingwith the same mind.

That is, they takeordinary materials.

But when you seethis, I remember.

So this is the verysame with Mr.

Kiley.

When you arrive inthis wooden [FRENCH], the atmosphere isrough steel, rusted.

And it's so soft.

Now the colors.

Last, we had to get through withprotecting against the debris, the wooden tram ofarriving with the flood.

We have to put this grid into avoid that [INAUDIBLE] into the dike and thenmake a catastrophe.

Now, it's a wooded trunk.

And we were faced withone thing, very simple.

It's impossible tomake– the engineer said you make a straight line.

Impossible with a machine.

The ground is not perfect.

So everything wasgoing– one certainty, it will be nevera straight line.

So I start to think howto avoid a straight line.

It's the lastimage, don't worry.

So I put a [FRENCH] of aline, one meter of distance, which is thedistance in between.

And I asked to the office,do something not to straight.

And they started tomake a very soft curve.

And I said, thatdoes not matter.

We have not hadenough constraints.

So we have to have arule to make exception.

If you have no rules,you can't make exception.

You have a kind of veryimprecise and uninteresting form.

So I made this lineand put my [INAUDIBLE].

So my wife, she's an artist.

She came and said, no,Georges, you write music.

It was true.

It was like this at the end.

And I said, no, no.

But this reflectionof this artist.

I should go to see SteveReich or Philip Glass because they makerepetitive music.

Maybe they willrepetitive score.

And as usual, it's a caseof when you find something without knowing it.

It's [INAUDIBLE], no? It's [INAUDIBLE].

You are looking for something,and you find something else.

There's a name.

And looking for this,I found this partition, which is exactly the 36 pillarshere with one meter here.

And it's by John Cage.

And the title of thepartitions is In a Landscape.

Now we really made this.

So this is a partition, a score.

And then you have this [FRENCH].

And you look.

They were playing the partition.

Thank you.

[APPLAUSE].

Source: Youtube

English Gardens- Tips from a Pro

Hello everyone, I hope you are enjoying thisgarden history unit.

I want to talk to you today about the mid1700s english garden and the different influences that era has on landscapes today and how youcan apply some of the features in a modern-day landscape.

And my name is Katrina Lansman.

In the early 1700s English gardens were influencedby French garden design.

Then, because of political conflicts betweenEngland and France many gardens were destroyed and a new naturalistic approach was developed.

The “new” english gardens involved windingpaths and open lawns.

The English created gardens that utilizedthe existing topography and even included grazing cattle and sheep.

English design really began to capitalizeon numerous views within the landscape.

Remember though, everything was supposed tolook natural, with large rolling lawns, large lakes, and clumps of trees.

But, don’t be fooled, the lakes and clumpsof trees were carefully planned.

The english also included two main structuresin their designs.

Ha-ha’s and follies.

A Ha-ha is a fence to keep cattle or sheepin, but a ditch is dug where the fence gets built so that the fence does not obscure theview of the large lawn.

A folly is a constructed building that isprimarily for decoration or an accent in the landscape A folly would be carefully placed along withthe trees to make sure there was a new view around each wind of a path.

The image on the bottom in the middle isfrom the movie Pride and Prejudice if you are familiar with the scene including the folly.

Examples of these English style gardens areCentral Park in New York City, New York.

Iowa State University’s campus in Ames,IA.

You will find that most universities’ campuseshave a mid 1700s English style and feel.

Fun fact, Iowa State University’s campusand central park were both designed by Frederick Law Olmstead.

If you want to create a design with Mid 1700’sEnglish style influence, you could incorporate a large lawn, informal planting designs, theuse of larger trees, follies, winding paths, and maybe you even let a sheep roam aroundto help keep your lawn trimmed.

Just remember to keep the scale of the designin mind.

Thanks for watching! This has been part of the Online Garden DesignCourse through the Department of Horticulture at Iowa State University.

Source: Youtube

Formal & Informal Garden Design Guide

Welcome back to garden ninja today I'm going to taking you through the differences between the formal and informal garden design to better help you when it comes to designing your own gardn there are quite a few differences between formal and informal gardens so I thought really useful today to take a pencil and start drawing out the two different styles of design to you an idea of where they differ you can go to see the characteristics of both formal and informal garden design so starting with formal garden design folder gardens are based on symmetry sometimes they may use a grid or axis which all the garden is planned off their based on geometry neatness and order making sure symmetry either the beds the planting or hard landscaping maybe for people that like super neatness to control mother nature and to adapt all the planting plans to fit your needs so formal gardens are usually know as quite high maintenance and require quite a lot of design to right if you're thinking of the palace of Versailles Knot Garden Stately homes where the gardens are laid out symmetrically in a geometric pattern you've probably seen formal gardens in formal gardens on the hand so much broader spectrum of garden so we're talking about more natural look maybe using asymmetry where there's a balance on one side against another that isnt perfectly symmetrical the use of different geometric shapes curves and planting groups means that in full gardens are much broader style when you hear of things like cottage gardens japanese gardens Mediterranean styles they're all styles of informal gardens and it's a much broader scope you have to be careful with informal gardens because it's a broader scope and the more natural sometimes you can design lazily thinking it looks natural but really it just cuts corners.

So I'm going take you through two example plans to show the difference between a formal garden and informal garden so you can see the rules should be following to ensure designs success what I'm doing here starting sketching formal garden you will notice all the measurements precise and in proportion with the house now although this design is not going to win The Chelsea flower show will be commended by Cleve West s it is here is an example to show you how the proportions and balance laid out in the formal garden so we got here for symmetrical beds the pathway running in a crisscross between the two this design could be folded like a napkin and still provide symmetry which is key with formal gardens I have included some standards for the middle of each of these beds to give the unity to the planting scheme some low hedging you have also finished it with small water feature in the center its edge to something like maybe Lavender o show the proportion scale again it's always in balance and here it is a very basic but proportional and balanced formal garden design could be folded on any axis perfect symmetry.

The informal design is very different by using large geometrical circles and breaking up some of the square edges using a curvy design i'm using circles to hide something harder square of the design trying to keep it more natural now I know the path just draw is a pretty weak curve which is design no no, this is just a quick rough drawing to give you an idea I've included some herbaceous perennial borders a round lawn in the center some paved areas here using consistent paving and a few trees to give an example how we may lay out an informal garden design.

So here we have it my really speedy two designs side by side they probably won't take me longer than 10 minutes and that does show in the designs it does give you a good idea to formal garden design phases the in-form and the differences that you might see so there we have a whistle-stop guide between formal and informal garden design now obviously these are only very basic designs and there are hundreds if not thousands of different permeatations but why not have a look at some of my other videos on youtube or subscribe to my channel to find more helpful guides to both garden design and gardening? I'm garden india thanks for watching and tune back soon.

Source: Youtube

Bonham Backyard Garden Ideas

hey everyone in this video I want to talk a bit about bonham backyard garden ideas yet tell me at this point all you really want is just a landscaping company that will be there to answer any of your questions give you advice on what's best for your property and at the same time no they can be reliable and professional and it's really hard to put faith on a professional when you have hired someone that promise to finish it but didn't thought they had experienced but it was their first year charged higher but didn't deliver or various other problems I know I know it's hard and you shouldn't have to worry about it but by the end of the video I want to fix that and give you something to take all that worry away so you don't have to worry about it ever again hey this is sirelios landscaping services and here's a little info about us one our Facebook landscaping page and community is one of the biggest in fannin county to our clients can message us ask us any questions and know they'll get a professional and correct answer back three they can expect getting a response back within a couple hours and all of this at your convenience but don't take it from us here one of our post getting demolished with questions here's our inbox full with more questions and our posts have the words of satisfied clients who know the extra mile we go but you might be thinking well this seems like a dream i won't have to worry about these types of questions I'll get an actual professional with actual proof and on top of that he's a community man only gives his services to fannin county yet all of this must cost a pretty high prize it must cost something like a hundred dollars a month right well tell me is it worth to take the stress out of any landscaping questions you might have and know that you will never hire an incompetent landscaper ever again eliminating that stress will allow you to be happier each day give more in quality time to your family instead of just being there stressed the whole time and bringing the mood of the environment down you honestly don't want that or maybe even walking into work in treating someone unfairly because of your stress and feeling really horrible about it later because the stress tell me though isn't this worth for well what if i were to tell you it's only twenty-five dollars a month is twenty dollars a month worth being happier around your family and friends and reducing stress but don't take it from me scientists say stress takes four to eight years out of your life so the question is now is twenty-five dollars monthly worth getting back for 28 years of your life but here's what we at sirelio's landscaping services will do for you we want to give it to you for free and this is a win-win you'll get the advanced towards any of your questions you might have plus the thought of knowing you have the best landscaper and fannin county but this won't last for long as there is the need for people to want a quality landscaping company that is there for them and spots my fill up faster than expected just imagine you're going to have a landscaping question in the future there's no doubt about it but with us you'll be able to simply open up your facebook send us a message and that set you won't have to go days trying to find the answer yourself and know it's from one of the fannin county's finest so i urge you to take advantage of this please go to our facebook page click the like button introduce yourself to us publicly or directly in our messenger on how you found us in any questions you might have do this right now to be part of the fannin county community that gets free advice on landscaping before spots fill in Fast and lastly this is only for those that want the power to have a professional landscaper that will be there to answer any other questions and professional services.

Source: Youtube

Bonham Designer Gardens

hey everyone in this video I want to talk a bit about bonham designer gardens yet tell me at this point all you really want is just a landscaping company that will be there to answer any of your questions give you advice on what's best for your property and at the same time no they can be reliable and professional and it's really hard to put faith on a professional when you have hired someone that promise to finish it but didn't thought they had experienced but it was their first year charged higher but then deliver or various other problems I know I know it's hard and you shouldn't have to worry about it but by the end of the video I want to fix that and give you something to take all that worry away so you don't have to worry about it ever again hey this is sirelios landscaping services and here's a little info about is one our Facebook landscaping page and community is one of the biggest invention county to our clients can message us ask us any questions and know they'll get a professional and correct answer back three they can expect getting a response back within a couple hours and all of this at your convenience but don't take it from us here one of our post getting demolished with questions here's our inbox full with more questions and our posts have the words of satisfied clients who know the extra mile we go but you might be thinking well this seems like a dream i won't have to worry about these types of questions I'll get an actual professional with actual proof and on top of that he's a community man only gets his services to fannin county yet all of this must cost a pretty high price it must cost something like a hundred dollars a month right well tell me is it worth to take the stress out of any landscaping question you might have and know that you will never hired an incompetent landscaper ever again eliminating that stress will allow you to be happier each day give more and quality time to your family instead of just being there stressed the whole time and bringing the mood of the environment down you honestly don't want that or maybe even walking into work and training someone unfairly because of your stress and feeling really horrible about it later because distress tell me though isn't this worth more well what if i were to tell you it's only twenty-five dollars a month is twenty dollars a month worth being happier around your family and friends and reducing stress but don't take it from me scientists say stress takes four to eight years out of your life so the question is now is twenty-five dollars monthly worth getting back for 28 years of your life but here's what we at sirelios landscaping services will do for you we want to give it to you for free and this is a win-win you'll get the advanced towards any of your questions you might have plus the thought of knowing you have the best landscaper and fannin county but this won't last for long as there is the need for people to want a quality landscaping company that is there for them and spots my fill up faster than expected just imagine you're going to have a landscaping question in the future there's no doubt about it but with us you'll be able to simply open up your facebook send us a message and that set you won't have to go days trying to find the answer yourself and know it's from one of the fannin county's finest so i urge you to take advantage of this please go to our facebook page click the like button introduce yourself to us publicly or directly in our messenger on how you found us in any questions you might have do this right now to be part of the fannin county community that gets free advice on landscaping before spots fill in Fast and lastly this is only for those that want the power to have a professional landscaper that will be there to answer any other questions and professional services.

Source: Youtube

Water by Design previews hot tubs for Roanoke Home and Garden Show

THE "GREATER ROANOKE HOME AND GARDEN SHOW" RETURNS TO THE ROANOKE CIVIC CENTER STARTING TODAY– AND WSLS TEN IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF THIS EVENT.

OVER THE NEXT THREE DAYS.

THE BERGLUND CENTER WILL BE PACKED WITH IDEAS AND INSPIRATION.

W-S-L-S 10'S ERIN BROOKSHIER JOINS US LIVE FROM THE BERGLUND CENTER.

ERIN– WHAT CAN WE EXPECT? # THIS IS THE EIGHTH YEAR FOR THE GREATER ROANOKE HOME AND GARDEN SHOW.

AND IT'S GREAT TIMING IF YOU HAVE SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS YOU'RE LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

TO REVAMPING YOUR BACK YARD– THERE REALLY IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY PROJECT.

IS THIS EVENT ONLY FOR HOMEOWNERS? NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH WILL INCLUDE FOOD TASTINGS.

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AND WINE TASTINGS FROM FINCASTLE VINEYARDS.

THERE ARE EVEN ACTIVITIES FOR THE KIDS– THE COOKIE STORE WILL BE THERE WITH A FREE COOKIE DECORATING ZONE.

NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

HOME AND GARDEN SHOW.

AND IT'S GREAT TIMING IF YOU HAVE SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS YOU'RE LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

TO REVAMPING YOUR BACK YARD– THERE REALLY IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY PROJECT.

IS THIS EVENT ONLY FOR HOMEOWNERS? NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH WILL INCLUDE FOOD TASTINGS.

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AND WINE TASTINGS FROM FINCASTLE VINEYARDS.

THERE ARE EVEN ACTIVITIES FOR THE KIDS– THE COOKIE STORE WILL BE THERE WITH A FREE COOKIE DECORATING ZONE.

GIVING OUT YOUR CELL PHONE.

Source: Youtube

That Garden Girl: Garden Planning

GARDNERS EVERYWHERE ARE POURING OVER THEIR CATALOGS AND PLANNING THEIR GARDENS NOW.

HEATHER OWE BRINE, GREAT TO SEE YOU.

GREAT TO BE HERE.

IT'S JANUARY, SO MANY PEOPLE ARE ITCHING TO GET THEIR GARDENS GOING.

ESPECIALLY WHEN THE WEATHER PEAKS OUT AND IT'S NICE.

YOU BROUGHT A CATALOG WITH YOU.

THIS IS A CATALOG I RECENTLY RECEIVED FROM THE SOUTH IN EXPOSURE SEED EXCHANGE, I JUST GOT MY PLANT LUST GOING.

YES, I KNOW, RIGHT.

SO WHAT'S THE FIRST STEP, WHAT SHOULD WE DO WHEN WE GET A CATALOG LIKE THIS.

FIRST OF ALL I WOULD LOOK THROUGH IT AND SEE WHAT INTERESTS YOU, I ALWAYS TURN TO THE TOMATOES WHICH ARE — AND WHAT THIS CATALOG WILL TELL YOU HOW LONG IT TAKES TO GET A FRUIT, IT WILL TELL YOU KIND OF IF IT'S A MILD FLAVOR, MORE ACIDIC, IT COULD EVEN TELL YOU IF IT'S A GOOD CANNING TOMATO OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

AND IT WILL TELL YOU IF IT'S A HEIRLOOM OR HYBRID.

SO YOU GET A LOT OF INFORMATION IN THESE CATALOGS THAT WILL HELP YOU IN YOUR PLANNING PROCESS.

WHAT ARE THE DON'TS? DON'T ORDER EVERYTHING? WELL YES, DON'T GO CRAZY, YOU KNOW, BECAUSE YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE THE SPACE.

ANOTHER THING SOME OF THESE CATALOGS WILL HAVE GAME MICK PLANTS.

SO IT WILL BE LIKE THIS TREE BLOOMS THREE DIFFERENT COLORS AT ONE TIME AND JUST THE PICTURE IS SO LOVELY.

BUT JUST BE AWARE WHEN IT'S SO FANTASTIC YOU MAY NOT GET WHAT YOU WANT.

A GOOD SEVERAL MY PARENTS BROUGHT A FRUIT COCKTAIL TREE ONE TIME AND IT WAS A FREE THAT GREW FIVE FRUITS ON ONE TREE, YES.

WELL THAT'S A GRAFTED TREE, THEY TOOK PARTS, KIND OF LIKE A FRANKENSTEIN TREE, AND MY PARENTS HAVE HAD HAD THOSE TREES FOR 10 YEARS AND NOT GOTTEN ONE FRUIT.

YOU'RE KIDDING? RIGHT, SO BE AWARE IF IT'S FANTASTIC, DO SOME RESEARCH FIRST TO MAKE SURE IT'S SOMETHING WORTH ORDERING.

OKAY, THIS IS SOMETHING YOU DID IN THE GREEN ROOM A FEW MINUTES AGO, YOU DREW A PLOT OUT, WHY DID DO YOU THAT? THIS IS ONE OF OUR — THIS IS THE KIND OF THE SIZE OF THE GARDEN BED I HAVE.

ONE HE GO THROUGH THE CATALOG YOU START TO THINK OH, MA BROCCOLI LOOKS NEAT, THIS VARIETY OF BROCCOLI LOOKS COOL, YOU THINK OH, DO I HAVE SPACE FOR IT? SO DRAW OUT, PUT LIKE OH, WELL WE USUALLY HAVE THREE TOMATO PLOTS THERE.

AND THEN OH, WELL I DO HAVE ROOM FOR FOUR BROCCOLIS.

OKAY.

IT HELPS YOU KIND OF SEE IF YOU WANT TO GROW SOMETHING NEW, IF YOU HAVE THE SPACE FOR IT OR TAKE OUT A TOMATO PLANT TO ADD EXTRA SWISS CHARD OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

THIS IS A GREAT IDEA, HOW MANY TIMES HAVE I PLANTED TOMATOES AND I PLANTED THEM TOO CLOSE AND THEY ARE GROW INTO EACH OTHER AND DON'T GET A THING.

I TALKED ABOUT THIS, THE SQUARE FOOT GARDEN METHOD IS REALLY FOR ME HELPS ME REALLY PLAN MY GARDEN OUT.

AND REALLY THAT BOOK, THE ALL NEW SQUARE FOOT GARDEN METHOD IS MY GARDENING BIBLE AND IT WILL TELL YOU HOW MANY SQUARE FEET YOU NEED ONE TOMATO WHICH IS TYPICALLY 4 SQUARE FEET.

BROCCOLI YOU CAN GROW ONE IN EACH SQUARE FOOT WHICH I KIND OF HAVE SHOWN ON MY DIAGRAM.

AND YOU CAN HAVE, YOU KNOW, NINE ONIONS IN A SQUARE FOOT.

THIS IS A GREAT IDEA.

MAYBE YOU CAN COME BACK AND SHOW US HOW WE CAN PLOT OUT OUR GARDEN.

ABSOLUTELY.

Source: Youtube

Chinese Garden Design Tips

Here I am today in Nan Lian Gardens in Kowloon which is a classic example of chinese garden design it was constructed in 2006 I'm super excited today to walk around unfortunately though, it's raining and I'll take some videos show some of the design examples that could use in your own front or back garden based on Chinese garden design The gardens based on the Tang dynasty style of chinese garden design it covers 3.

4 hectars in the Kowloon district of Hong Kong and it's a fantastic example of traditional Chinese garden design as it uses both rocks and pruned manicured trees to represent nature at its most perfect so its design guide is to help give you some hints and tips to get the most out of your Chinese garden design So the first step is to try and keep your designs free-flowing as possible trying to avoid hard sharp edges right angles or anything that looks too manufactured.

You want things to feel natural and flow.

Soft curves can make the transition through various parts of the garden feel really relaxed and give a sense of discovery the next step which is a focal point or even a borrowed view.

A borrowed view is a term used in garden design quite frequently what it means is that rather than trying to mask off or hide something in the distance you actually use it to your advantage play to its strength in the case of the Nan Lian garden, it's a skyscrapers that sore above the garden and by using that as the borrowed view it actually gives the garden far greater scale pulls those buildings in to make it look like it's a cohesive part of the garden design The next tip would be the art of extension.

What do I mean by this? What it means is that you want a visitor someone in the garden to look around it What's over there? What's round the corner? What's just over that hill? By using the art extension you're actually guiding a visitor around the garden providing and the last tip is that of repetition.

By using similar materials throughout the garden trees or specimens you can invoke a sense of unity in the garden and that's what gives the Chinese garden design it's real strength it's the consistency the fact you'll be using groups of similar rocks or trees together as if it were in the wild but clearly this is a very well-put-together idea so that your garden visitors know that this has been designed it's not hodge podge, it's not thrown together, it's very well-considered really relaxing and natural and that's quite hard balance to get.

It wouldn't be fair I didn't do a short segment incredible bonsai that I found in the garden and here we have the bonsai tree selection which are small manicured trees I did say it's going to be very short! So let's just recap on the design tips that we've gone through that the first one is to keep it natural the second tip is to use a focal point of borrowed view, the third tip is to use extension to lead people around the garden and the last tip is repetition, repetition, repetition! If you like this video why not check out some other clips on youtube channel I've been Garden Ninja, thanks for watching!.

Source: Youtube

Healing Garden Design

Our thanks to our friends at the American Botanical Council for sharing their garden with us.

And right now we're going to be talking about one of my favorite topics: gardening and spirituality.

I'm joined by Brian Ott, who's a landscape designer here in town.

Now Brian you've been responsible for creating healing gardens in hospitals and I know this whole topic is really important to you, so we really appreciate you being on the program.

– Absolutely.

Happy to be here.

– There is a healing quality to gardens and you actually have professionally used that information to create healing spaces, haven't you? -Absolutely, yeah.

– Tell me a little bit about them.

The idea that we connect to nature, I think, is something that's an innate in us as humans, and, you know, for many years I think we started to maybe lose our way a little bit as far as the power of nature and the power of the garden and what it can do for us, and so over the past 20 years I think there's really been a rebirth and understanding that connecting the nature to being outside, access to natural light and natural air really create a lot of health value for us.

– Right.

– And it's really wonderful to be a part of a kind of a regeneration of these ideas.

And so it's a lot of fun.

– Well, fun indeed, and also, for many people, profoundly important in their lives.

You reference just the health benefits of seeing beautiful scenes, being out in the air, being taken out of ourselves and experiencing something in nature, and actually we were just talking about this.

There's hard data behind this now, really, isn't there?- Absolutely, there's been research probably now going on 30 to 40 years that really starts to study, not only in just healthcare settings, but in, you know, whether it's childhood obesity or attention deficit disorder, the idea that we can walk in nature, the idea that we can explore the natural air and natural light.

They've had profound recognition that they do – children who access natural spaces gain as much value as some of the medication that we're prescribing for children who have ADHD or ADD.

And so it really does start to show you that, you know, prescribing outdoors is a sense of medicine.

And it is important.

– Absolutely.

Right, and you know it's only been in the last couple of generations that people think about this.

Mankind has been around for hundreds of thousands of years.

Most of the time we lived outdoors and huddled at night around a campfire.

It's only been in recent years, really, that we've kind of divorced ourself from that kind of thing.

Really, profoundly in the last hundred years.

– Absolutely.

– You know, and so we evolved in co-relationship with our surroundings and now we've blocked it out.

We're looking at screens, you know?- And I think some of the health statistics around it shows what happens when we do that, when we do detach from it, because we start to see obesity rates go up, we start to see heart failure, different things that we're really being challenged with that, as you mentioned, we didn't have as many of those challenges when we were either hunters and gatherers or in an agrarian society that we're finding in this technology-based world that we're living in.

– And you know, the thing that – when people ask me about this topic, the first thing that comes to mind for me is, "gardens provide us with a profound – some sense of connection to something that is eternal and beyond us.

– Absolutely.

– And so we are able to put our hands, literally, into the universe in a way when we we're working with the soil and working with plants.

Absolutely, it's very holistic, and you know it also kind of mirrors that of life.

The seasons in the garden — You're right – – The change that we see from spring to summer to fall, and it allows us to really connect, you know, kind of internally to that, and it provides a lot of spirituality for us.

– Yeah.

And there's some overt things that you can do to kind of build in those sensitive connections for yourself.

I always urge people, if they're going to create a garden space, to make it really personal, to put some element in there that really speaks to what they love most in nature and what they would need most from nature.

– Absolutely.

You know, it's interesting as a landscape architect we often have to think about how we impose our creativity as designers to a site.

But when I started working on healing gardens and healing environments, it really taught me to be more empathetic as a designer because it really does take that – you have to walk in somebody's shoes to understand what they're going through, whether it's a crisis or whether it's just kind of maneuvering through the daily chaos that we can sometimes find ourselves in.

What does it feel like, and what does the garden do for you? So even small intimate spaces can have a lot of value to allow us to really kind of reconnect and kind of explore a little bit.

– I used to teach a class on how to design a spiritual garden, and I'd asked people at the beginning of class to think back to their childhood and what were the places that were most special to them, the places they loved to go when they were little kids.

And it was really interesting.

With women, it was usually a hiding place, a cove-like space, a little sanctuary, and ninety percent of time for the guys, it was a tree fort.

– Yep, yep, lots of tree forts, and for me it was in a creek about two blocks from where I grew up.

– You know, but those are archetypal places of a promontory that you can look out and scan the landscape or some place intimate where you can feel sheltered.

– Absolutely, absolutely.

I think that's what the garden does for us.

It provides shelter for us, it provides an escape, and a lot of comfort can be found there, and it's a great place to, as we said, detach a little bit, you know, and be able to let the mind explore and that's – you know, can't be understated how much that the brain – our mind needs to rest.

– It absolutely needs it.

You know, I had created a garden some years ago and it became my morning habit, every morning, I gotta do what I called my "second cup of coffee walk" – Yeah.

– Every morning I'd to go out into the garden and I would walk around a bit, but I would always find a place to sit, and I had multiple sitting areas where you could be secluded, or you could see the whole thing or, and I'd sit out there, and amazing things happened as a result.

The birds and the wildlife coming up to explore you.

You know, and having that interaction was really amazing.

– It automatically helps declutter the mind and prepares you for the day.

– Right, which we need in these times.

I think, you know, people would say we live in the information age.

I say, "No, we live in the age of distraction.

" And this is the opposite of that.

It builds our capacity for attention.

– Absolutely, you know one of the other things that we found in healthcare settings is the main visitors to the garden aren't necessarily the patients.

You know, it's really there for family and in a lot of instances, in fact fifty percent, it's staff.

So when you think about it, it's a place that allows them to kind of recharge, reconnect so that they can deliver a higher level of healthcare.

And so those are really important parts of the puzzle when we think about overall community health and spiritual health.

– You know, when you're saying that, it reminds me of the story – a very famous museum was designed, I won't say where, but it won all sorts of architecture awards, but the whole building was covered with this heavy copper scrim, blocking the interior light.

It won architecture awards, but the employees working in that Museum needed to be given the light breaks during the course of a day where they had permission to walk outside because they needed its psychologically.

– Absolutely.

It's interesting.

– It's easy to sometimes forget those things or at least it has been in the past, I do think that we're living in an age right now that the empirical, you know, knowledge about connection to nature, connection to natural light and natural air are becoming so important that I think that's going to really drive a lot of design in the near future.

– Real quickly, has there been some book or garden itself that has been particularly inspirational to you in regards to this? – You know, of course Richard Louv's "Last Child In the Woods" is one of those books that really brings it all together.

And again, it's a very holistic approach of where we used to be and how we grew up but how we need to make sure that we still teach others, and so that book has been, you know, very I think instrumental as I think about the profession.

Any natural place, I think, is really kind of a spiritual place to me so there's lots of them.

But I think just being in nature is such an important piece to it.

– Well Rich Louv says, "Let your kids go outdoors", I think we need to let ourselves go outdoors, and we can find healing as a result.

Brian, it has been a real pleasure.

– Thank you for having me.

– Yeah, this is a great topic.

Thank you for your work on it.

– Absolutely.

– Coming up next is Daphne.

Source: Youtube

How to Plan a Bigger, Better Garden – Easy Vegetable Garden Planning

The importance of planning at the start of a growing season can’t be overemphasized.

Before you so much as lift a rake, considering what you’re going to grow where, and crucially, when you’re going to sow or plant it, will help you to get the most from your garden.

In this video, we’ll show you how to plan for your most successful growing season yet.

It pays to take time to get to know your garden.

For instance, observing where the shade falls in your garden will help you to pick the right plant for the right place.

Tender crops like tomatoes, peppers and squash will thrive in a sunny part of the garden, while leafy greens and many fleshy herbs and salads will prefer a part-shaded area, particularly in hot climates.

In a sunny garden, pockets of shade can be created by growing taller plants in front of shorter ones – for instance, we can grow these sunflowers in front of these lettuces.

Planning in this way also flags up variations in wind exposure, essential for ensuring healthy plants.

For example climbing beans can get damaged in a windy area, while corn – which is pollinated by light wind – may be a better choice for this spot.

Keeping track of what you plan to grow where makes crop rotation a lot simpler.

Rotating crops from the same family to a new bed each year reduces the chances for pests and diseases to build up in the soil and it helps to keep the soil in great condition.

To help you do this, our Garden Planner flashes red any areas that were previously occupied by plants from the same crop rotation family so you know to place it elsewhere.

Different crops place different demands on the soil.

Cabbage for example is a very hungry plant so it’s a good idea to grow it after beans or peas which will actually help to enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen.

Once you’ve harvested your cabbages the soil will be less rich, so you could replant with root crops such as carrots which don’t need high fertility to thrive.

Once you’ve chosen what you’d like to grow it will help to know when everything can be sown, planted and harvested.

A good garden plan will include key dates of these activities so nothing is missed out or forgotten as the season gets busier.

This is where our Garden Planner comes into its own.

Having decided where to position everything, you can then click on the accompanying Plant List to see exactly when to sow indoors, sow or plant outdoors, and harvest based on climate data for your location.

The Garden Planner will even send you timely sowing and planting reminders twice a month to help keep you on track.

The Garden Planner also shows precisely how many plants you’ll need for the space you have available, so you know the minimum number to sow or plant – plus of course some spares.

It also means you can buy just the right number of seed containers, potting soil and plant supports so you’ll have them to hand when you need them rather than rushing out last minute – and that means no more over-spending in all the excitement! Proper planning means you can keep your plot as productive as possible for as long as possible, so as one crop’s finished, another is waiting in the wings to replace it.

The Garden Planner’s Succession Planting tool makes planning this easy.

Start by setting the months that each plant will be growing in your garden.

You can then view your plan in a specific month to see where gaps appear as crops are harvested.

Let’s select July.

You can see there’s now a few spaces, including where the early potatoes had been growing.

We can filter the selection bar.

to show plants suitable for setting out in July.

Now it’s just a matter of choosing a crop – this Swiss chard for example – and dropping it into the space.

That simple bit of planning has doubled the number of harvests we’lll get from the same piece of ground.

Planning your garden should be top of any gardener’s to-do list because it saves time, money and unnecessary disappointment.

Working out the best layout for your crops can be hugely satisfying, and it sets you up for success.

Let us know what you’ve got planned by dropping us a comment below.

Now, our video channel is a very friendly one with an active community and lots of shared advice so if you haven’t yet subscribed we’d love you to join us and get involved too.

I’ll catch you next time.

 

Source: Youtube