English Gardens- Tips from a Pro

Hello everyone, I hope you are enjoying thisgarden history unit.

I want to talk to you today about the mid1700s english garden and the different influences that era has on landscapes today and how youcan apply some of the features in a modern-day landscape.

And my name is Katrina Lansman.

In the early 1700s English gardens were influencedby French garden design.

Then, because of political conflicts betweenEngland and France many gardens were destroyed and a new naturalistic approach was developed.

The “new” english gardens involved windingpaths and open lawns.

The English created gardens that utilizedthe existing topography and even included grazing cattle and sheep.

English design really began to capitalizeon numerous views within the landscape.

Remember though, everything was supposed tolook natural, with large rolling lawns, large lakes, and clumps of trees.

But, don’t be fooled, the lakes and clumpsof trees were carefully planned.

The english also included two main structuresin their designs.

Ha-ha’s and follies.

A Ha-ha is a fence to keep cattle or sheepin, but a ditch is dug where the fence gets built so that the fence does not obscure theview of the large lawn.

A folly is a constructed building that isprimarily for decoration or an accent in the landscape A folly would be carefully placed along withthe trees to make sure there was a new view around each wind of a path.

The image on the bottom in the middle isfrom the movie Pride and Prejudice if you are familiar with the scene including the folly.

Examples of these English style gardens areCentral Park in New York City, New York.

Iowa State University’s campus in Ames,IA.

You will find that most universities’ campuseshave a mid 1700s English style and feel.

Fun fact, Iowa State University’s campusand central park were both designed by Frederick Law Olmstead.

If you want to create a design with Mid 1700’sEnglish style influence, you could incorporate a large lawn, informal planting designs, theuse of larger trees, follies, winding paths, and maybe you even let a sheep roam aroundto help keep your lawn trimmed.

Just remember to keep the scale of the designin mind.

Thanks for watching! This has been part of the Online Garden DesignCourse through the Department of Horticulture at Iowa State University.

Source: Youtube

Formal & Informal Garden Design Guide

Welcome back to garden ninja today I'm going to taking you through the differences between the formal and informal garden design to better help you when it comes to designing your own gardn there are quite a few differences between formal and informal gardens so I thought really useful today to take a pencil and start drawing out the two different styles of design to you an idea of where they differ you can go to see the characteristics of both formal and informal garden design so starting with formal garden design folder gardens are based on symmetry sometimes they may use a grid or axis which all the garden is planned off their based on geometry neatness and order making sure symmetry either the beds the planting or hard landscaping maybe for people that like super neatness to control mother nature and to adapt all the planting plans to fit your needs so formal gardens are usually know as quite high maintenance and require quite a lot of design to right if you're thinking of the palace of Versailles Knot Garden Stately homes where the gardens are laid out symmetrically in a geometric pattern you've probably seen formal gardens in formal gardens on the hand so much broader spectrum of garden so we're talking about more natural look maybe using asymmetry where there's a balance on one side against another that isnt perfectly symmetrical the use of different geometric shapes curves and planting groups means that in full gardens are much broader style when you hear of things like cottage gardens japanese gardens Mediterranean styles they're all styles of informal gardens and it's a much broader scope you have to be careful with informal gardens because it's a broader scope and the more natural sometimes you can design lazily thinking it looks natural but really it just cuts corners.

So I'm going take you through two example plans to show the difference between a formal garden and informal garden so you can see the rules should be following to ensure designs success what I'm doing here starting sketching formal garden you will notice all the measurements precise and in proportion with the house now although this design is not going to win The Chelsea flower show will be commended by Cleve West s it is here is an example to show you how the proportions and balance laid out in the formal garden so we got here for symmetrical beds the pathway running in a crisscross between the two this design could be folded like a napkin and still provide symmetry which is key with formal gardens I have included some standards for the middle of each of these beds to give the unity to the planting scheme some low hedging you have also finished it with small water feature in the center its edge to something like maybe Lavender o show the proportion scale again it's always in balance and here it is a very basic but proportional and balanced formal garden design could be folded on any axis perfect symmetry.

The informal design is very different by using large geometrical circles and breaking up some of the square edges using a curvy design i'm using circles to hide something harder square of the design trying to keep it more natural now I know the path just draw is a pretty weak curve which is design no no, this is just a quick rough drawing to give you an idea I've included some herbaceous perennial borders a round lawn in the center some paved areas here using consistent paving and a few trees to give an example how we may lay out an informal garden design.

So here we have it my really speedy two designs side by side they probably won't take me longer than 10 minutes and that does show in the designs it does give you a good idea to formal garden design phases the in-form and the differences that you might see so there we have a whistle-stop guide between formal and informal garden design now obviously these are only very basic designs and there are hundreds if not thousands of different permeatations but why not have a look at some of my other videos on youtube or subscribe to my channel to find more helpful guides to both garden design and gardening? I'm garden india thanks for watching and tune back soon.

Source: Youtube

Bonham Backyard Garden Ideas

hey everyone in this video I want to talk a bit about bonham backyard garden ideas yet tell me at this point all you really want is just a landscaping company that will be there to answer any of your questions give you advice on what's best for your property and at the same time no they can be reliable and professional and it's really hard to put faith on a professional when you have hired someone that promise to finish it but didn't thought they had experienced but it was their first year charged higher but didn't deliver or various other problems I know I know it's hard and you shouldn't have to worry about it but by the end of the video I want to fix that and give you something to take all that worry away so you don't have to worry about it ever again hey this is sirelios landscaping services and here's a little info about us one our Facebook landscaping page and community is one of the biggest in fannin county to our clients can message us ask us any questions and know they'll get a professional and correct answer back three they can expect getting a response back within a couple hours and all of this at your convenience but don't take it from us here one of our post getting demolished with questions here's our inbox full with more questions and our posts have the words of satisfied clients who know the extra mile we go but you might be thinking well this seems like a dream i won't have to worry about these types of questions I'll get an actual professional with actual proof and on top of that he's a community man only gives his services to fannin county yet all of this must cost a pretty high prize it must cost something like a hundred dollars a month right well tell me is it worth to take the stress out of any landscaping questions you might have and know that you will never hire an incompetent landscaper ever again eliminating that stress will allow you to be happier each day give more in quality time to your family instead of just being there stressed the whole time and bringing the mood of the environment down you honestly don't want that or maybe even walking into work in treating someone unfairly because of your stress and feeling really horrible about it later because the stress tell me though isn't this worth for well what if i were to tell you it's only twenty-five dollars a month is twenty dollars a month worth being happier around your family and friends and reducing stress but don't take it from me scientists say stress takes four to eight years out of your life so the question is now is twenty-five dollars monthly worth getting back for 28 years of your life but here's what we at sirelio's landscaping services will do for you we want to give it to you for free and this is a win-win you'll get the advanced towards any of your questions you might have plus the thought of knowing you have the best landscaper and fannin county but this won't last for long as there is the need for people to want a quality landscaping company that is there for them and spots my fill up faster than expected just imagine you're going to have a landscaping question in the future there's no doubt about it but with us you'll be able to simply open up your facebook send us a message and that set you won't have to go days trying to find the answer yourself and know it's from one of the fannin county's finest so i urge you to take advantage of this please go to our facebook page click the like button introduce yourself to us publicly or directly in our messenger on how you found us in any questions you might have do this right now to be part of the fannin county community that gets free advice on landscaping before spots fill in Fast and lastly this is only for those that want the power to have a professional landscaper that will be there to answer any other questions and professional services.

Source: Youtube

Bonham Designer Gardens

hey everyone in this video I want to talk a bit about bonham designer gardens yet tell me at this point all you really want is just a landscaping company that will be there to answer any of your questions give you advice on what's best for your property and at the same time no they can be reliable and professional and it's really hard to put faith on a professional when you have hired someone that promise to finish it but didn't thought they had experienced but it was their first year charged higher but then deliver or various other problems I know I know it's hard and you shouldn't have to worry about it but by the end of the video I want to fix that and give you something to take all that worry away so you don't have to worry about it ever again hey this is sirelios landscaping services and here's a little info about is one our Facebook landscaping page and community is one of the biggest invention county to our clients can message us ask us any questions and know they'll get a professional and correct answer back three they can expect getting a response back within a couple hours and all of this at your convenience but don't take it from us here one of our post getting demolished with questions here's our inbox full with more questions and our posts have the words of satisfied clients who know the extra mile we go but you might be thinking well this seems like a dream i won't have to worry about these types of questions I'll get an actual professional with actual proof and on top of that he's a community man only gets his services to fannin county yet all of this must cost a pretty high price it must cost something like a hundred dollars a month right well tell me is it worth to take the stress out of any landscaping question you might have and know that you will never hired an incompetent landscaper ever again eliminating that stress will allow you to be happier each day give more and quality time to your family instead of just being there stressed the whole time and bringing the mood of the environment down you honestly don't want that or maybe even walking into work and training someone unfairly because of your stress and feeling really horrible about it later because distress tell me though isn't this worth more well what if i were to tell you it's only twenty-five dollars a month is twenty dollars a month worth being happier around your family and friends and reducing stress but don't take it from me scientists say stress takes four to eight years out of your life so the question is now is twenty-five dollars monthly worth getting back for 28 years of your life but here's what we at sirelios landscaping services will do for you we want to give it to you for free and this is a win-win you'll get the advanced towards any of your questions you might have plus the thought of knowing you have the best landscaper and fannin county but this won't last for long as there is the need for people to want a quality landscaping company that is there for them and spots my fill up faster than expected just imagine you're going to have a landscaping question in the future there's no doubt about it but with us you'll be able to simply open up your facebook send us a message and that set you won't have to go days trying to find the answer yourself and know it's from one of the fannin county's finest so i urge you to take advantage of this please go to our facebook page click the like button introduce yourself to us publicly or directly in our messenger on how you found us in any questions you might have do this right now to be part of the fannin county community that gets free advice on landscaping before spots fill in Fast and lastly this is only for those that want the power to have a professional landscaper that will be there to answer any other questions and professional services.

Source: Youtube

Water by Design previews hot tubs for Roanoke Home and Garden Show

THE "GREATER ROANOKE HOME AND GARDEN SHOW" RETURNS TO THE ROANOKE CIVIC CENTER STARTING TODAY– AND WSLS TEN IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF THIS EVENT.

OVER THE NEXT THREE DAYS.

THE BERGLUND CENTER WILL BE PACKED WITH IDEAS AND INSPIRATION.

W-S-L-S 10'S ERIN BROOKSHIER JOINS US LIVE FROM THE BERGLUND CENTER.

ERIN– WHAT CAN WE EXPECT? # THIS IS THE EIGHTH YEAR FOR THE GREATER ROANOKE HOME AND GARDEN SHOW.

AND IT'S GREAT TIMING IF YOU HAVE SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS YOU'RE LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

TO REVAMPING YOUR BACK YARD– THERE REALLY IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY PROJECT.

IS THIS EVENT ONLY FOR HOMEOWNERS? NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH WILL INCLUDE FOOD TASTINGS.

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AND WINE TASTINGS FROM FINCASTLE VINEYARDS.

THERE ARE EVEN ACTIVITIES FOR THE KIDS– THE COOKIE STORE WILL BE THERE WITH A FREE COOKIE DECORATING ZONE.

NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

HOME AND GARDEN SHOW.

AND IT'S GREAT TIMING IF YOU HAVE SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS YOU'RE LOOKING TO GET FINISHED.

FROM IDEAS FOR THE FRONT DOOR.

TO REVAMPING YOUR BACK YARD– THERE REALLY IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY PROJECT.

IS THIS EVENT ONLY FOR HOMEOWNERS? NO WAY– THERE IS ALSO AN ART, GIFT AND GOURMET AREA– WHICH WILL INCLUDE FOOD TASTINGS.

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AND WINE TASTINGS FROM FINCASTLE VINEYARDS.

THERE ARE EVEN ACTIVITIES FOR THE KIDS– THE COOKIE STORE WILL BE THERE WITH A FREE COOKIE DECORATING ZONE.

GIVING OUT YOUR CELL PHONE.

Source: Youtube

That Garden Girl: Garden Planning

GARDNERS EVERYWHERE ARE POURING OVER THEIR CATALOGS AND PLANNING THEIR GARDENS NOW.

HEATHER OWE BRINE, GREAT TO SEE YOU.

GREAT TO BE HERE.

IT'S JANUARY, SO MANY PEOPLE ARE ITCHING TO GET THEIR GARDENS GOING.

ESPECIALLY WHEN THE WEATHER PEAKS OUT AND IT'S NICE.

YOU BROUGHT A CATALOG WITH YOU.

THIS IS A CATALOG I RECENTLY RECEIVED FROM THE SOUTH IN EXPOSURE SEED EXCHANGE, I JUST GOT MY PLANT LUST GOING.

YES, I KNOW, RIGHT.

SO WHAT'S THE FIRST STEP, WHAT SHOULD WE DO WHEN WE GET A CATALOG LIKE THIS.

FIRST OF ALL I WOULD LOOK THROUGH IT AND SEE WHAT INTERESTS YOU, I ALWAYS TURN TO THE TOMATOES WHICH ARE — AND WHAT THIS CATALOG WILL TELL YOU HOW LONG IT TAKES TO GET A FRUIT, IT WILL TELL YOU KIND OF IF IT'S A MILD FLAVOR, MORE ACIDIC, IT COULD EVEN TELL YOU IF IT'S A GOOD CANNING TOMATO OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

AND IT WILL TELL YOU IF IT'S A HEIRLOOM OR HYBRID.

SO YOU GET A LOT OF INFORMATION IN THESE CATALOGS THAT WILL HELP YOU IN YOUR PLANNING PROCESS.

WHAT ARE THE DON'TS? DON'T ORDER EVERYTHING? WELL YES, DON'T GO CRAZY, YOU KNOW, BECAUSE YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE THE SPACE.

ANOTHER THING SOME OF THESE CATALOGS WILL HAVE GAME MICK PLANTS.

SO IT WILL BE LIKE THIS TREE BLOOMS THREE DIFFERENT COLORS AT ONE TIME AND JUST THE PICTURE IS SO LOVELY.

BUT JUST BE AWARE WHEN IT'S SO FANTASTIC YOU MAY NOT GET WHAT YOU WANT.

A GOOD SEVERAL MY PARENTS BROUGHT A FRUIT COCKTAIL TREE ONE TIME AND IT WAS A FREE THAT GREW FIVE FRUITS ON ONE TREE, YES.

WELL THAT'S A GRAFTED TREE, THEY TOOK PARTS, KIND OF LIKE A FRANKENSTEIN TREE, AND MY PARENTS HAVE HAD HAD THOSE TREES FOR 10 YEARS AND NOT GOTTEN ONE FRUIT.

YOU'RE KIDDING? RIGHT, SO BE AWARE IF IT'S FANTASTIC, DO SOME RESEARCH FIRST TO MAKE SURE IT'S SOMETHING WORTH ORDERING.

OKAY, THIS IS SOMETHING YOU DID IN THE GREEN ROOM A FEW MINUTES AGO, YOU DREW A PLOT OUT, WHY DID DO YOU THAT? THIS IS ONE OF OUR — THIS IS THE KIND OF THE SIZE OF THE GARDEN BED I HAVE.

ONE HE GO THROUGH THE CATALOG YOU START TO THINK OH, MA BROCCOLI LOOKS NEAT, THIS VARIETY OF BROCCOLI LOOKS COOL, YOU THINK OH, DO I HAVE SPACE FOR IT? SO DRAW OUT, PUT LIKE OH, WELL WE USUALLY HAVE THREE TOMATO PLOTS THERE.

AND THEN OH, WELL I DO HAVE ROOM FOR FOUR BROCCOLIS.

OKAY.

IT HELPS YOU KIND OF SEE IF YOU WANT TO GROW SOMETHING NEW, IF YOU HAVE THE SPACE FOR IT OR TAKE OUT A TOMATO PLANT TO ADD EXTRA SWISS CHARD OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

THIS IS A GREAT IDEA, HOW MANY TIMES HAVE I PLANTED TOMATOES AND I PLANTED THEM TOO CLOSE AND THEY ARE GROW INTO EACH OTHER AND DON'T GET A THING.

I TALKED ABOUT THIS, THE SQUARE FOOT GARDEN METHOD IS REALLY FOR ME HELPS ME REALLY PLAN MY GARDEN OUT.

AND REALLY THAT BOOK, THE ALL NEW SQUARE FOOT GARDEN METHOD IS MY GARDENING BIBLE AND IT WILL TELL YOU HOW MANY SQUARE FEET YOU NEED ONE TOMATO WHICH IS TYPICALLY 4 SQUARE FEET.

BROCCOLI YOU CAN GROW ONE IN EACH SQUARE FOOT WHICH I KIND OF HAVE SHOWN ON MY DIAGRAM.

AND YOU CAN HAVE, YOU KNOW, NINE ONIONS IN A SQUARE FOOT.

THIS IS A GREAT IDEA.

MAYBE YOU CAN COME BACK AND SHOW US HOW WE CAN PLOT OUT OUR GARDEN.

ABSOLUTELY.

Source: Youtube

Chinese Garden Design Tips

Here I am today in Nan Lian Gardens in Kowloon which is a classic example of chinese garden design it was constructed in 2006 I'm super excited today to walk around unfortunately though, it's raining and I'll take some videos show some of the design examples that could use in your own front or back garden based on Chinese garden design The gardens based on the Tang dynasty style of chinese garden design it covers 3.

4 hectars in the Kowloon district of Hong Kong and it's a fantastic example of traditional Chinese garden design as it uses both rocks and pruned manicured trees to represent nature at its most perfect so its design guide is to help give you some hints and tips to get the most out of your Chinese garden design So the first step is to try and keep your designs free-flowing as possible trying to avoid hard sharp edges right angles or anything that looks too manufactured.

You want things to feel natural and flow.

Soft curves can make the transition through various parts of the garden feel really relaxed and give a sense of discovery the next step which is a focal point or even a borrowed view.

A borrowed view is a term used in garden design quite frequently what it means is that rather than trying to mask off or hide something in the distance you actually use it to your advantage play to its strength in the case of the Nan Lian garden, it's a skyscrapers that sore above the garden and by using that as the borrowed view it actually gives the garden far greater scale pulls those buildings in to make it look like it's a cohesive part of the garden design The next tip would be the art of extension.

What do I mean by this? What it means is that you want a visitor someone in the garden to look around it What's over there? What's round the corner? What's just over that hill? By using the art extension you're actually guiding a visitor around the garden providing and the last tip is that of repetition.

By using similar materials throughout the garden trees or specimens you can invoke a sense of unity in the garden and that's what gives the Chinese garden design it's real strength it's the consistency the fact you'll be using groups of similar rocks or trees together as if it were in the wild but clearly this is a very well-put-together idea so that your garden visitors know that this has been designed it's not hodge podge, it's not thrown together, it's very well-considered really relaxing and natural and that's quite hard balance to get.

It wouldn't be fair I didn't do a short segment incredible bonsai that I found in the garden and here we have the bonsai tree selection which are small manicured trees I did say it's going to be very short! So let's just recap on the design tips that we've gone through that the first one is to keep it natural the second tip is to use a focal point of borrowed view, the third tip is to use extension to lead people around the garden and the last tip is repetition, repetition, repetition! If you like this video why not check out some other clips on youtube channel I've been Garden Ninja, thanks for watching!.

Source: Youtube

Healing Garden Design

Our thanks to our friends at the American Botanical Council for sharing their garden with us.

And right now we're going to be talking about one of my favorite topics: gardening and spirituality.

I'm joined by Brian Ott, who's a landscape designer here in town.

Now Brian you've been responsible for creating healing gardens in hospitals and I know this whole topic is really important to you, so we really appreciate you being on the program.

– Absolutely.

Happy to be here.

– There is a healing quality to gardens and you actually have professionally used that information to create healing spaces, haven't you? -Absolutely, yeah.

– Tell me a little bit about them.

The idea that we connect to nature, I think, is something that's an innate in us as humans, and, you know, for many years I think we started to maybe lose our way a little bit as far as the power of nature and the power of the garden and what it can do for us, and so over the past 20 years I think there's really been a rebirth and understanding that connecting the nature to being outside, access to natural light and natural air really create a lot of health value for us.

– Right.

– And it's really wonderful to be a part of a kind of a regeneration of these ideas.

And so it's a lot of fun.

– Well, fun indeed, and also, for many people, profoundly important in their lives.

You reference just the health benefits of seeing beautiful scenes, being out in the air, being taken out of ourselves and experiencing something in nature, and actually we were just talking about this.

There's hard data behind this now, really, isn't there?- Absolutely, there's been research probably now going on 30 to 40 years that really starts to study, not only in just healthcare settings, but in, you know, whether it's childhood obesity or attention deficit disorder, the idea that we can walk in nature, the idea that we can explore the natural air and natural light.

They've had profound recognition that they do – children who access natural spaces gain as much value as some of the medication that we're prescribing for children who have ADHD or ADD.

And so it really does start to show you that, you know, prescribing outdoors is a sense of medicine.

And it is important.

– Absolutely.

Right, and you know it's only been in the last couple of generations that people think about this.

Mankind has been around for hundreds of thousands of years.

Most of the time we lived outdoors and huddled at night around a campfire.

It's only been in recent years, really, that we've kind of divorced ourself from that kind of thing.

Really, profoundly in the last hundred years.

– Absolutely.

– You know, and so we evolved in co-relationship with our surroundings and now we've blocked it out.

We're looking at screens, you know?- And I think some of the health statistics around it shows what happens when we do that, when we do detach from it, because we start to see obesity rates go up, we start to see heart failure, different things that we're really being challenged with that, as you mentioned, we didn't have as many of those challenges when we were either hunters and gatherers or in an agrarian society that we're finding in this technology-based world that we're living in.

– And you know, the thing that – when people ask me about this topic, the first thing that comes to mind for me is, "gardens provide us with a profound – some sense of connection to something that is eternal and beyond us.

– Absolutely.

– And so we are able to put our hands, literally, into the universe in a way when we we're working with the soil and working with plants.

Absolutely, it's very holistic, and you know it also kind of mirrors that of life.

The seasons in the garden — You're right – – The change that we see from spring to summer to fall, and it allows us to really connect, you know, kind of internally to that, and it provides a lot of spirituality for us.

– Yeah.

And there's some overt things that you can do to kind of build in those sensitive connections for yourself.

I always urge people, if they're going to create a garden space, to make it really personal, to put some element in there that really speaks to what they love most in nature and what they would need most from nature.

– Absolutely.

You know, it's interesting as a landscape architect we often have to think about how we impose our creativity as designers to a site.

But when I started working on healing gardens and healing environments, it really taught me to be more empathetic as a designer because it really does take that – you have to walk in somebody's shoes to understand what they're going through, whether it's a crisis or whether it's just kind of maneuvering through the daily chaos that we can sometimes find ourselves in.

What does it feel like, and what does the garden do for you? So even small intimate spaces can have a lot of value to allow us to really kind of reconnect and kind of explore a little bit.

– I used to teach a class on how to design a spiritual garden, and I'd asked people at the beginning of class to think back to their childhood and what were the places that were most special to them, the places they loved to go when they were little kids.

And it was really interesting.

With women, it was usually a hiding place, a cove-like space, a little sanctuary, and ninety percent of time for the guys, it was a tree fort.

– Yep, yep, lots of tree forts, and for me it was in a creek about two blocks from where I grew up.

– You know, but those are archetypal places of a promontory that you can look out and scan the landscape or some place intimate where you can feel sheltered.

– Absolutely, absolutely.

I think that's what the garden does for us.

It provides shelter for us, it provides an escape, and a lot of comfort can be found there, and it's a great place to, as we said, detach a little bit, you know, and be able to let the mind explore and that's – you know, can't be understated how much that the brain – our mind needs to rest.

– It absolutely needs it.

You know, I had created a garden some years ago and it became my morning habit, every morning, I gotta do what I called my "second cup of coffee walk" – Yeah.

– Every morning I'd to go out into the garden and I would walk around a bit, but I would always find a place to sit, and I had multiple sitting areas where you could be secluded, or you could see the whole thing or, and I'd sit out there, and amazing things happened as a result.

The birds and the wildlife coming up to explore you.

You know, and having that interaction was really amazing.

– It automatically helps declutter the mind and prepares you for the day.

– Right, which we need in these times.

I think, you know, people would say we live in the information age.

I say, "No, we live in the age of distraction.

" And this is the opposite of that.

It builds our capacity for attention.

– Absolutely, you know one of the other things that we found in healthcare settings is the main visitors to the garden aren't necessarily the patients.

You know, it's really there for family and in a lot of instances, in fact fifty percent, it's staff.

So when you think about it, it's a place that allows them to kind of recharge, reconnect so that they can deliver a higher level of healthcare.

And so those are really important parts of the puzzle when we think about overall community health and spiritual health.

– You know, when you're saying that, it reminds me of the story – a very famous museum was designed, I won't say where, but it won all sorts of architecture awards, but the whole building was covered with this heavy copper scrim, blocking the interior light.

It won architecture awards, but the employees working in that Museum needed to be given the light breaks during the course of a day where they had permission to walk outside because they needed its psychologically.

– Absolutely.

It's interesting.

– It's easy to sometimes forget those things or at least it has been in the past, I do think that we're living in an age right now that the empirical, you know, knowledge about connection to nature, connection to natural light and natural air are becoming so important that I think that's going to really drive a lot of design in the near future.

– Real quickly, has there been some book or garden itself that has been particularly inspirational to you in regards to this? – You know, of course Richard Louv's "Last Child In the Woods" is one of those books that really brings it all together.

And again, it's a very holistic approach of where we used to be and how we grew up but how we need to make sure that we still teach others, and so that book has been, you know, very I think instrumental as I think about the profession.

Any natural place, I think, is really kind of a spiritual place to me so there's lots of them.

But I think just being in nature is such an important piece to it.

– Well Rich Louv says, "Let your kids go outdoors", I think we need to let ourselves go outdoors, and we can find healing as a result.

Brian, it has been a real pleasure.

– Thank you for having me.

– Yeah, this is a great topic.

Thank you for your work on it.

– Absolutely.

– Coming up next is Daphne.

Source: Youtube

How to Plan a Bigger, Better Garden – Easy Vegetable Garden Planning

The importance of planning at the start of a growing season can’t be overemphasized.

Before you so much as lift a rake, considering what you’re going to grow where, and crucially, when you’re going to sow or plant it, will help you to get the most from your garden.

In this video, we’ll show you how to plan for your most successful growing season yet.

It pays to take time to get to know your garden.

For instance, observing where the shade falls in your garden will help you to pick the right plant for the right place.

Tender crops like tomatoes, peppers and squash will thrive in a sunny part of the garden, while leafy greens and many fleshy herbs and salads will prefer a part-shaded area, particularly in hot climates.

In a sunny garden, pockets of shade can be created by growing taller plants in front of shorter ones – for instance, we can grow these sunflowers in front of these lettuces.

Planning in this way also flags up variations in wind exposure, essential for ensuring healthy plants.

For example climbing beans can get damaged in a windy area, while corn – which is pollinated by light wind – may be a better choice for this spot.

Keeping track of what you plan to grow where makes crop rotation a lot simpler.

Rotating crops from the same family to a new bed each year reduces the chances for pests and diseases to build up in the soil and it helps to keep the soil in great condition.

To help you do this, our Garden Planner flashes red any areas that were previously occupied by plants from the same crop rotation family so you know to place it elsewhere.

Different crops place different demands on the soil.

Cabbage for example is a very hungry plant so it’s a good idea to grow it after beans or peas which will actually help to enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen.

Once you’ve harvested your cabbages the soil will be less rich, so you could replant with root crops such as carrots which don’t need high fertility to thrive.

Once you’ve chosen what you’d like to grow it will help to know when everything can be sown, planted and harvested.

A good garden plan will include key dates of these activities so nothing is missed out or forgotten as the season gets busier.

This is where our Garden Planner comes into its own.

Having decided where to position everything, you can then click on the accompanying Plant List to see exactly when to sow indoors, sow or plant outdoors, and harvest based on climate data for your location.

The Garden Planner will even send you timely sowing and planting reminders twice a month to help keep you on track.

The Garden Planner also shows precisely how many plants you’ll need for the space you have available, so you know the minimum number to sow or plant – plus of course some spares.

It also means you can buy just the right number of seed containers, potting soil and plant supports so you’ll have them to hand when you need them rather than rushing out last minute – and that means no more over-spending in all the excitement! Proper planning means you can keep your plot as productive as possible for as long as possible, so as one crop’s finished, another is waiting in the wings to replace it.

The Garden Planner’s Succession Planting tool makes planning this easy.

Start by setting the months that each plant will be growing in your garden.

You can then view your plan in a specific month to see where gaps appear as crops are harvested.

Let’s select July.

You can see there’s now a few spaces, including where the early potatoes had been growing.

We can filter the selection bar.

to show plants suitable for setting out in July.

Now it’s just a matter of choosing a crop – this Swiss chard for example – and dropping it into the space.

That simple bit of planning has doubled the number of harvests we’lll get from the same piece of ground.

Planning your garden should be top of any gardener’s to-do list because it saves time, money and unnecessary disappointment.

Working out the best layout for your crops can be hugely satisfying, and it sets you up for success.

Let us know what you’ve got planned by dropping us a comment below.

Now, our video channel is a very friendly one with an active community and lots of shared advice so if you haven’t yet subscribed we’d love you to join us and get involved too.

I’ll catch you next time.

 

Source: Youtube

Tantalizing Garden Tiers |Syd Teague |Central Texas Gardener

Rambling wanders and broad-sweep views converge in shady hideaways on land that Sid Tieg has shaped since the late nineties.

Now with husband Larry Evans, it's become her outdoor laboratory that guides her design.

I came to Austin in 1997 from the desert, from Tucson, Arizona, and I decided that I wanted to build a house and so I bought this property and when I did, it was just a prairie.

First on her design drawing board: managing stormwater runoff from uphill.

At the back of the property, she's formalized a drainage ditch.

Closer up, rocky swales act as dry creek beds to direct water flow away from the house.

The Corps of Engineer did the main water gully, but the other two in the backyard – there are three – were done by me.

Basically they were designed as I watched the water during the rain to see where it naturally went.

As each step was done, the next step became obvious.

And so what I decided to do was to build more berms and protect the downside of that gully so that the water was pushed away from the house and and kept its bounds, and then I knew that I had to plant the berms.

Rising above the swales, mounded earth berms cradle plants in uplifting dimension.

I love the rocks, but I don't think I want to look at the rocks from my inside as much.

And since iIm using the rocks for grass, it's the space holder that most people would put grass in.

Then I put an edge around it so that you can contain your eye if you don't want to look at the rocks.

One of the berms was way back in the back of the yard and I thought, "I'm not going to want to water all of this yard, this yard is just too big".

And so I decided that since I had come from the desert, that would be a perfect place to put cactus, so the soil I put there was more what the soil required to grow cactus would be.

I planted my cactus garden back there.

I planted the berms, and I thought, "Now, what's next?" And after I thought about it, I thought, "Well the next thing would be I would like to have a sidewalk that gets me around the yard.

" Shelf rock she had originally bought for a pond that never happened was just the ticket.

I started right here at the porch and decided to build it out and around.

That's a lot of work and it didn't get all done it once.

Raphael has been with me for a long time and he would bring the rock and put it down.

We would do about 20 feet every year, 20-30 feet every year, so it took a very long time to do the sidewalks.

That was a big direction in gardening because once I got the sidewalks in, then I wanted to have flower beds around the sidewalks.

And so as I built the 20-foot sidewalk, I also started developing a flower bed so I'd have something to look at while I was walking there.

And so I did do a lot of soil change.

I have five feet of clay in this yard, and that's ok for some things and not so great for others, so I did a lot of soil amending.

I brought in a lot of good compost.

I do a lot of Texas native hardwood mulch and as that disintegrates, it creates good soil.

So by adding mulch on top of mulch over the years, I've continued to grow my soil.

I'm a plant lover.

I love all kinds of plants.

So really a lot of the design part as far as plantings are concerned came because I'm just curious.

And for several years there would be one of this one of that.

– Then, she realized the power of mass plantings and repetitions.

I've decided that there are a few plants that I like to spread out throughout the yard to add a little bit of continuity.

I found that if you put the same plant in different places, your eye comes to it and it kind of makes a unified area even though you have the separate spaces.

I do that with plumbago.

I have plumbago all over.

I do it with Esperanza.

I do it with pride of Barbados.

I do it with roses.

You know, just some things i scatter from one room to another.

– When she discovered miniature re-blooming drift roses, cautiously, she tried one.

Its performance over years convinced her to gradually add more.

– And I like the way the red goes out into the yard so you see the salvia, the roses, and then you go way out into the berm and you see the roses back there, the red roses, so it draws your eye which is what I really like.

The fact that when you're inside and you look out, your eye goes all the way to the back because you see something that's familiar and your eye rests on it.

I have bicolor iris all over my yard and that's one of those plants that holds down the other plantings around it, that gives you some grounding.

It's an upright plant, and I'm not crazy about most grasses, I'm not a grass lover, but the bicolor iris gives me that shape.

And it has beautiful flowers in the spring.

And we're very fortunate here that we have a yard that goes from the house up, so it actually presents a beautiful situation for planting small plants and then larger plants and then larger plants.

– One break from the view is a row of crape myrtle trees when one suddenly popped up from a neighbor's tree, and she moved it.

And so I had a place that when you looked out of the bedroom, you kind of looked all the way to the backyard, and I didn't like that idea, so I thought, "I'm going to put that tree right between my view of of the back fence and the bedroom.

Now I have like seven or eight beautiful crepe myrtles.

– When a neighbor's little gem magnolia seeded in the drainage ditch, she moved it to a close-up spot to scent the garden every spring.

Then, a mystery plant appeared at the base of the tree.

Something grew up and it looked like grass, and I thought, "I wonder what this is".

And about year six or seven it turned into a palm tree.

Syd got another surprise one Christmas when she bought a tiny pine tree and planted it outside.

– And as it got bigger, I finally was able to identify it as an Italian stone pine.

And eventually, I believe they get to be 70 feet tall, something like that.

– Just across the dry creek bed shady hollows enclose brightly adorned hideaways.

Then Syd found just the right artwork to signify each venue A lover of cactus, she turned a patio into a gallery that she and Larry once imagined for a spa.

They swapped that idea for something to enjoy every day.

– The cactus little plants don't really like full sun, so eventually we decided that we'd put a part shade tarp across it so that it gets about sixty to seventy percent sun and then the ones that don't like sun at all, especially afternoon sun, we plant on one side of the little area and the ones that like a lot of afternoon sun, we'd plant on the other side.

Thanks to cactus fountains they found in Tucson, birds, lizards, and toads claim it as their daily spa.

Syd and Larry's garden reflects all seasons in its changing patterns.

With his camera, Larry documents its annual history in a calendar.

The real starting point for Syd's gardens began long ago.

– When I was a tiny little girl, we were a military family.

We moved every year, but my dad always had a garden, and I've always had an interest in being outdoors and a strong curiosity about plants and animals and how they interact.

I had this big piece of property, I had to do something with it, and so it became my laboratory.

That's kind of how it all came about.

Source: Youtube